Quip Toothbrush Review

Quip Electric Toothbrush Review

Editor’s Note

We have covered the kids version of this brush in our Quip kids toothbrush review.

Our Verdict

Quip offers a level of convenience that many today demand.

No longer do you need to remember when to change the brush head, a new one will just turn up.

Slim, stylish and functional, Quip is particularly good for travelers, thanks to the innovate case come toothbrush holder.

As a seasoned electric toothbrush user, the motor feels weak, the clean no better that a manual brush and certainly not as invigorating as deep cleaning as other electric brushes I have used.

Pros

  • Slim and lightweight
  • 1 cleaning mode
  • Built-in timer
  • Removable batteries
  • Travel case double up as a wall mount
  • Subscription service
  • American Dental Association approved

Cons

  • Cleaning experience feels weak in comparison other brushes
  • No battery status/feedback
  • No pressure sensor

The 3 BIG questions about the Quip electric toothbrush

If you are short of time, the answers to the following 3 questions should let you know all you need to about the Quip toothbrush.  If I have missed something, let me know in the comments.

If you want more detail, you can read my full Quip Toothbrush review further down the page.

1. Is there anything drastically wrong with this toothbrush?

It is compact, and stylish.  The concept of subscription and the way the plans work is innovative.

Sadly the brush is, well, a bit ‘meh’.

It lacks power and feels weak compared to a regular electric toothbrush.  It is better than your conventional manual toothbrush because of the timer built-in, but it is an expensive route to go for something that does not provide a noticeably better clean or experience.

Unless you’re specifically interested in the subscription model, we recommend checking out some of the choices from our recommended brushes list.

2. Which other brushes should I consider?

Alternative options depend on whether you are considering Quip because of the subscription mode, the minimalist design, or because you want an electric toothbrush.

If you want a subscription based electric toothbrush, check out our Goby toothbrush review. We’ve looked at a range of subscription options and rate Goby as the best subscription toothbrush.

Not bothered by subscription, but want a decent electric toothbrush, take a look at our Sonicare ProtectiveClean 4100 review.

We’ve actually looked at Quip next to Sonicare and Oral-B in our Quip vs Sonicare & Oral-B post.

Or for a detailed comparison of all buying options, see our best electric toothbrush roundup.

Also, if you’re interested in Quip because of its removable battery, check out our post on the best battery operated toothbrush.

3. Where is the best place to buy Quip?

What makes Quip unique is their business model, which is primarily centered around a subscription plan.

Initially, it was only through www.getquip.com, but you can now buy the Quip brush from Target.

At this time you will still need to buy refills from the Quip website itself.

Why should you listen to us?

Electric Teeth is an independent organization with a mission to simplify dental health.

Our team is a mixture of consumers and dental professionals.

We strive to create honest, informative content, telling you the facts, good or bad.

We are not sponsored by big brands or healthcare companies. Our site is funded by affiliate revenue and ads, but we only recommend products that we have tested and truly believe to be worth your money.

Why not watch this short video to find out all about us?

Video Review

Quip Electric Toothbrush Review [USA]

And now for a bit more detail….

Quip is innovative and is, without doubt, one of the leading names in subscription based toothbrush services.

The US based company have won many fans locally and internationally as a result of their product, design and subscription model.

Competing brands and products exist, particularly within the USA.  All have their own benefits and drawbacks, but Quip appears to be the one to beat in many people’s eyes.

With regular brush head deliveries turning up when you need them, Quip offers a certain level of convenience that regular toothbrushes and dental products do not.

Subscription and costs

You don’t have to subscribe to regular deliveries of replacement brush heads or toothpastes, you can buy as and when you require, but the basic model is centered around you buying a brush, and subscribing, so that you receive a new brush head every 3 month’s, just when it is time to replace the existing head.

Here are the details of the packages (prices correct at time of writing)

There are 2 ‘Starter Sets’.

  • Electric Set
    • Day 1 – quip electric brush, travel cover mount, large toothpaste, small toothpaste
      • Cost -$40 for metal or $25 for plastic
    • 3 months – brush head, large toothpaste, AAA battery
      • Cost -$10
  • Electric Brush
    • Day 1 – quip electric brush, travel cover mount
      • Cost – $45 for metal or $30 for plastic
    • 3 months – brush head, AAA battery
      • Cost – $5

The brushes themselves come in different materials and color options.

  • Silver metal
  • Slate metal
  • Copper metal
  • Gold metal
  • Blue plastic
  • Green plastic

There are also two special edition colors.

  • Red metal
  • All-black metal
    • A donation is made to the American Dental Association Foundation to help provide oral health education and dental care for disadvantaged families.  You can learn more here.

These special editions may incur a premium price.

If you prefer you can choose a ‘Prepay Deal’ paying for a whole years subscriptions once.

  • Electric Set
    • Day 1 – quip electric brush, travel cover mount, large toothpaste, small toothpaste
      • Cost -$65 for metal or $50 for plastic
    • 3 months – brush head, large toothpaste, small toothpaste, AAA battery
      • Cost -$FREE
  • Electric Brush
    • Day 1 – quip electric brush, travel cover mount
      • Cost – $55 for metal or $40 for plastic
    • 3 months – brush head, AAA battery
      • Cost – $FREE

There are then ‘Group Sets’ ideal for couples or families.

  • Electric Couple Set
    • Day 1 – x2 quip electric brush, travel cover mount, large toothpaste, small toothpaste
      • Cost -$75 for metal or $50 for plastic
    • Day 1 – x2 quip electric brush, travel cover mount, large toothpaste, small toothpaste
      • Cost -$20
  • Electric Family Set
    • Day 1 – x4 quip electric brush, travel cover mount, large toothpaste, small toothpaste
      • Cost – $150 for metal or $125 for metal and plastic
    • 3 months – x4 refill head, large toothpaste, small toothpaste, AAA battery
      • Cost – $40

There is less color choice with the Electric Couple Set offered in only Silver + Slate Metal (1 of each) or Blue + Green Plastic (1 of each).

The Electric Family Set is available in all metal with Silver, Slate, Copper and Gold Metal or a combination package with Silver and Slate Metal (1 of each) and Blue and Green Plastic (1 of each).

Finally, there is what is known as the supply collection.  Essentially extras and spares.

  • Toothbrush head – $5 initial cost followed by $5 every 3 months
  • Toothpaste – $5 initial cost followed by $5 every 3 months
  • Manual toothbrush – $10 initial cost followed by $5 every 3 months
  • Travel cover mount – $5 initial cost, no refills

For the most accurate pricing do check quips own website over on the quip website.

Variants of this brush

As the section above outlines, there are a number of different variants of this brush.

Whilst the actual brush is essentially the same with the only actual product difference being the construction, be that plastic or metal as well as the color, it is what is included and the plan length that varies.

The material does have an effect on the price.

There is too a Quip manual toothbrush, which looks virtually identical to the electric variant, but naturally does not have the motor or timer built into it.

You can buy the manual toothbrush and have a brush head subscription plan with that if you would like.

Be sure to understand what model you are looking at and whether it is right for you.

What’s in the box?

This will depend on the plan you have gone for and may not be the same as below. I went for Quip’s ‘Electric set’ plus a spare brush head.

  • Quip electric toothbrush in Copper Metal
  • 2 x Brush head 1 x (included with brush and 1 x I purchased extra)
  • 1 x AAA battery
  • 1 x Travel cover mount
  • 1 x 2 week tube of toothpaste
  • 1 x 3 month tube of toothpaste
  • Documentation

I did also order a manual toothbrush for the sake of comparison.

Key Features

  • Built-in timer and pacer
  • Replaceable brush heads
  • Minimalist design
  • User replaceable battery
  • Slim and lightweight

Pros & Cons

What do I consider to be the positives and negatives of the Quip electric toothbrush?

The Positives

  • Design – The Copper metal handle I had looked and felt really good.  Solid, but light and there are some small but neat touches in the construction of the brush.
  • Packaging/experience – Tying in with the design, the packaging and whole user experience is very good and slick, offering a very premium feel from ordering through to the delivery and use.
  • Travel cover mount – So simple, yet ingeniously effective at holding and protecting the brush head when in transit but also keeping the brush out of harms way when not in use.
  • Automatic power off – The brush automatically turns off after a 2 minute clean.
  • Subscription – It is not for everyone, but the model works well and is very current and makes for a nice addition to consumers already engaged in other subscription based services and want the convenience that it brings.
  • American Dental Association approved – Quip has achieved the American Dental Association (ADA) seal of approval for the brush.

The Negatives

  • Cleaning experience – Feels somewhat odd.  Potentially better than a manual toothbrush but far weaker and less effective than a conventional electric toothbrush.  A kind of hybrid that for me just didn’t deliver.
  • Design – As smart as it looks, the position of the power button for me was not natural and a little awkward to get used to.
  • Battery Status – No indication of how much power is in the brush.
  • Pressure sensor – No pressure sensor to alert you if brushing with too much force.

Design, usability, clean & general use

Design and user experience is something Quip has absolutely nailed.

From the moment you hit their website through to receiving the toothbrush, the process is slick and well structured.

A great user experience is offered from quality images, clear information, though to the smart packaging.  You certainly feel like you get what you pay for and a bit more.

As you will see in the images, the products are well labeled nicely packaged and there is some really great documentation that comes with it.

In fact, this is probably the best documentation I have ever seen.

Rather than some tiny print manual, its a clean and simple to read A5 user manual with lots of information to explain how to use the brush, how to brush the teeth, etc.   Part of the documentation appears to ‘sell’ the subscription service but at the same time offering vital and helpful information.  I am really impressed with this.

The brush and replacement brush heads come in plastic tubes.  My initial reaction was one of disappointment because they look great and well protected, but I was thinking what a lot of plastic waste.  However, it is recyclable and there is even a sticker that alerts you to this.

As mentioned previously, the brush itself can be purchased in 2 different materials, plastic or aluminum.  I have the copper metal here and the handle itself feels excellent.  It is CNC’d aluminum, bead blasted by machine and anodized to endure a lifetime of cleaning.  Smooth and quality to the touch, it is smart looking for sure.

I did also pick up a manual brush which was plastic. I am presuming that this is the same material and quality of the electric brush with a plastic handle.

The plastic certainly looks and feels cheaper, but it is functional.

The design is minimalist.

The lower part of the brush handle is a perfectly rounded tube about 1.5cm thick.

No flat base to this brush, it has been rounded, like the bottom of a test tube,  it does not stand up.

No buttons, grips, status indicators or controls are on the handle.

2 thirds of the way up the handle you reach the point where the brush head attaches. This begins as a cylinder but tapers off to a much flatter profile before you reach the brush head itself.  More on the brush head shortly.

As the head tapers from the handle to the brush head it does so at an angle that offers up a flat surface.

A ‘q’ icon signals this and acts as the power button.

A single press to turn the brush on and a single press to turn it off.

There is just one cleaning mode.

Inside the brush handle is the battery and motor that makes this brush work.

To access this you need to disconnect the brush head, pull out the module to reveal a compartment for the AAA battery.  One does come supplied.

The following animation shows how this is done.

I am no design guru, but part of me believes, that for some, gripping onto this handle will be somewhat of an issue.  It’s quite smooth with no lips or fitting that offer natural gripping points.

It is also much slimmer than most regular electric toothbrushes so perhaps harder to grip onto if you can’t manage a tight grip.

The position of the power button is too not a natural place for the finger or thumb to fall in my opinion.  Within a few uses you do get more used to it, but I still find it a little awkward a few weeks on from first use.

I do like the look and feel of this brush a lot.  It certainly looks the part and is right at home in any modern bathroom.

Really innovative as well is the holder and travel cap.

Essentially a plastic tube with a suction pad on the back of it, it sticks to flat surfaces like tiles, mirrors and shower screens.  Just apply a little bit of pressure to make it stick.

The brush then sits within this.

Just lift the handle out when you need it and place it back in when you’re done.

It is a really novel feature, particularly as it can be pulled off the surface and popped over the brush head to protect it when in transit and essentially be a travel case for the brush.

Part of why this works so well is because the brush is so light.  There is very little weight on the pad that sticks to the wall. The minimalist design helps too.

It is all too easy for a toothbrush to get knocked or splashed when in the bathroom, this holder allows you to mount the brush out of the way of any trouble and is particularly good if you are short of shelf space, as regular brushes can take up quite a lot of room.

Another neat touch is that the base of the holder has a screw insert that can be removed to clean it out and release any grime that might have built up.

So, to the brush head then.

There is only one style of brush head, not multiple styles like you get with Oral-B and Sonicare

Unlike Oral-B’s round heads Quip has a brush head more similar to Sonicare and many manual brush heads.  It is a stretched oval shape.

It contains 1,200 soft DuPoint nylon bristles in 34 separate tufts in the center of the brush head.

On the outer edge are what appear to be silicone or possibly thermoplastic elastomer bristles.  Spaced wide apart there are 16  that form the outer edge of the brush head.  These are shorter than the nylon bristles.

The soft bristles are designed to be gentle on the teeth and gums and not do any damage or aggravate like some harder bristles can.

On the back of the brush head is a tongue cleaner that also has the Quip named shaped into it.

The importance of cleaning the tongue and the inside of the cheeks is underrated.  Scrape the back of the brush head along both to help remove additional plaque and bacteria that can contribute to bad breath.

Brush heads should be replaced every 3 month’s.  There are no indicator bristles on this head to remind you, but the subscription services acts as this reminder.  If you are not subscribed, you will need to remember to buy or replace the heads.

Whilst Quip do both an electric and a manual toothbrush (I have tested both) it is the electric brush I am most interested in.

The motor inside the brush handle vibrates at what Quip class as ‘an industry standard 15,000RPM to provide a thorough, yet non-damaging cleaning action’.

Having used many different brushes, the power and cleaning performance lacked, in my opinion.  It felt weak, under-powered and really not much better than a manual brush.  All I got was a gentle vibration.

Sonicare, for example, offers as standard twice the bristle movements of quip.  Whilst it is not all about the power, other brushes give a more active cleaning sensation, even if it might be artificial.

The way you normally brush with an electric toothbrush is different to a manual one.  With electric, you move it tooth to tooth and the brush does the work, whilst with manual, you do the work.

I was confused as to what approach to take with Quip, the documentation suggests short strokes, more like a manual brush.

I ultimately used it more like a manual brush with the benefit of sonic vibration, rather than thinking of it as an electric toothbrush.  It felt a little odd.

Now my review and tests are nowhere near scientific, but really, whilst I could feel the vibrations from the motor, the resulting clean from the electric brush felt no better than Quips manual brush.

The clean was not as deep or invigorating as any Sonicare and Oral-B brush to name just a few.

My mouth did feel fresh and clean, but I didn’t feel as satisfied as I would have had I used a more traditional electric toothbrush. In fact, the whole experience was disappointing.

On the plus side, the brush is quiet.

There are benefits to an electric toothbrush, but I would be the first to tell you that with the right technique, a manual brush is more than adequate.

However, I feel that few of the electric toothbrush benefits are really realized here with Quip.

It might be that the brush was doing more good than I could actually tell as I am not monitoring plaque levels like a dentist might, but I don’t think it is.

To my knowledge, no clinical trials have been completed to really show how good or bad quip really is.  I would like to see some more ‘science’ behind whether or not Quip should be worth your money.

That said, Quip have gotten seal of approval from the American Dental Association, so there must be something right about this brush.

I guess in part, a lot of this is what you are used to.  If you are used to a manual toothbrush you may see and feel the difference.  I am used to an electric toothbrush and this just felt under-powered and sadly I cannot shout about it.

Built into the motor is a timer and pacer.  This is the biggest reason to opt for a Quip electric brush over a manual one.  Too few brush for the right amount of time, so this can help significantly with that.

Pulsing every 30 seconds to help you evenly clean your teeth and gums, it cuts out at 2 minutes, after 3 pulses, to let you know when to stop.

Your mouth should be split into 4 sections when brushing.  Known as quadrants, there is the upper right, upper left, lower right, and lower left.  You brush each of these for 30 seconds.  It is the timer that keeps you paced and making sure you brush evenly.

I do believe if you are currently using a manual toothbrush and are thinking about going electric, then this could be worth consideration, particularly if you subscribe to the model of having brush heads delivered.

If however, you are already pretty good at replacing your brush head and taking care of your teeth, cleaning for the right time etc, then the benefits of Quip are reduced.

A feature that I would like to have seen included is a pressure sensor.

Perhaps I am asking too much (it would be hard to fit it in such a slim brush after-all), but a pressure sensor detects when the user is brushing with too much force.

Bristles of the brush need only skim the surface of the teeth, you don’t need to scrub them.  Too much pressure too frequently can contribute to conditions like gum recession, which is best avoided.

Many electric brushes now feature such technology, Quip doesn’t.

A problem many associate with electric toothbrushes is that the battery does not last that long.

With Quip, you get about 3 month’s from it.  It is too a user replaceable AAA battery.  You could use your own rechargeable AAA battery if you prefer.

When replacing the brush head, you can simply slide out the battery and replace with a fully charged/ fresh one.  If you are on a refill plan Quip supply a fresh AAA every 3 months.

Watch the animation to see how you replace the battery and head.

Unlike some other electric toothbrushes you do not get a pressure sensor to alert you if you are brushing too hard.  There is no additional cleaning modes for achieving certain things like Whitening nor can you change the intensity or strength of the brush motor.

In part, it is the simplicity and lack of extras with Quip that it appealing.

The particular package I opted for came with 2 tubes of toothpaste.  They were the same paste, but one was a large tube with 3 month’s of supply, whilst the other was a smaller tube with 2 weeks supply, ideal for taking away when traveling.

The paste has a mild mint flavor and is made up of the following ingredients:

ACTIVE INGREDIENT: Sodium Monofluorophosphate 0.76% (0.1% w/v fluoride) (anticavity ingredient) INACTIVE INGREDIENTS: Calcium Carbonate, Sorbitol, Water, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Hydrated Silica, Sodium Carboxymethyl, Cellulose, Flavor, Sodium Silicate, Sodium Benzoate, Sodium Saccharin

For those concerned with safety and animal testing, the toothpaste is not tested on animals and is suitable for Vegans.

The brush comes with a 1 year warranty, which is extended continuously if you are subscribed to the refill plan.

Overall its a lovely smart, light and desirable brush, but for me, that desire turns to disappointment when it comes to actual brushing.

Design and battery life might be better from Quip products, but seriously consider Goby and their subscription model.

It’s also worth looking at the Sonicare ProtectiveClean 4100.  It is not a subscription toothbrush but it cleans better in my opinion.

Summary of design, usability, clean & general use

  • Slim and stylish brush with a minimalist design
  • Hard to grip for some
  • Available in metal or plastic
  • Brush holder doubles up as a travel case
  • A single power button that launches 1 cleaning mode
  • The motor vibrates at 15,000 RPM
  • 1 brush head style with 1200 bristles
  • Powered by a single AAA battery
  • Clean is somewhat disappointing
  • American Dental Association approved
  • Built-in timer and pacer
  • No pressure sensor
  • 1 year warranty

Battery life

Most of the electric toothbrushes I have tested for Electric Teeth come with a fixed internal battery, that is recharged via a charging stand that connects to mains power.

Quip is one of a select few that are powered by a user removable battery.

In this case, it is a single AAA battery that fits inside the brush handle.

I have been testing this for a month and the battery is still going strong.

The battery life is helped by the fact that that the brush has an automatic power off feature.

Quip suggest a battery life of approximately 3 month’s from the 1 battery and they supply a new AAA with every brush head refill that is delivered, assuming you are subscribed.

The idea is you replace the battery and head at the same time to keep you going.

Of course, if you prefer, you could wait until it goes flat, but you may notice the brush slow and eventually stop as the power depletes.

If you prefer, you can use your own AAA or perhaps a rechargeable AAA rather than the disposable design that is supplied.

Being a user replaceable battery with a usage time that is so long, does make it convenient and particularly suitable for those traveling or cannot rely on a regular power supply for charging the brush.

However, as pointed out earlier in the review, the motor and the clean feels a little underpowered and is in part perhaps why the brush lasts so long using just 1 battery, where many others require charging within a couple of weeks.

When it does need replacing it is a simple process and can be completed in just a matter of seconds.

Summary of battery life

  • Supplied with and powered from a single AAA battery
  • New AAA supplied with subscription brush heads
  • The battery lasts approximately 3 month’s
  • Can use your own rechargeable battery if preferred

Price & where to buy

The price of a product and what you and I are prepared to pay for it is subjective and influenced by our desires and budgets.

If you love style and design, you may put a higher value on Quip than someone more focused on getting the absolute best product for their money.

Should convenience be your thing then you may feel it is worth a little extra spend to have this subscription.

Quip offers a number of different packages and plans at varying price points and in all reality, for what you get the price is pretty reasonable.

There are also a couple of ‘special edition’ variants, which will result in donations being made to charitable organizations on your behalf.

At the time of writing, there are two choices, each of which may be priced higher than other color options.

Choosing ‘Red metal’ will result in a donation being made to the (RED) charity in the fight against aids (you can learn more here), whilst the ‘All-black metal’ will result in a donation being made to the American Dental Association Foundation, to help provide oral health education and dental care for disadvantaged families (you can learn more here).

It is not abundantly clear just how much gets donated and really for how long.  With every purchase of the ‘All-black metal’ a $5 donation was to be made to the ADA foundation.  This would appear to end on Feb 1st 2019 with no comment on donations past this time.  With the RED donation, it suggests it pays for 30 days of HIV medicine.

There is the outright cost of the brush that is $45 assuming you opt for the metal variant.

The replacement brush heads are then $5 every 3 month’s and are delivered to your door with no shipping fees and includes a replacement AAA battery.

This is very comparable to Oral-B and Sonicare brush head costs.  But those do not normally come in subscription plans as just 1 at a time.  You usually have to purchase a pack of 4 heads.

Here at Electric Teeth, we like to price the brush over a 3 year period to try and offer a fair ownership cost comparison.

Quip works out at roughly $100 which is $0.09 cents per day.

This is far from the most expensive and is very comparable to other options available to you.

Compared to Goby, this is actually cheaper.

Goby works out at roughly $116 or $0.11 cents per day.  For me, this extra spend is worth it.  Although different in design the clean offered by this brush is better and that is most important in my mind.

You could consider other brushes that are not subscription based.  A great option is the aforementioned Sonicare 2 series.  This works out at  $128 over 3 years or $0.12 cents per day to own.

Oral-B’s Pro 1000 is about $117 or just $0.10 per day.

So Quip could actually be considered cheap.  But, if the way in which the brush cleans is important to you, the other more expensive options might be worth consideration.

Please note that all prices quoted are approximates and will vary based on location, supplier and time of purchase.  These figures were correct at the time of writing and should not be relied upon as hard fact, but used as a guide during your decision process.

Summary of price & where to buy

  • The price depends on the package and subscription plan chosen
  • A typical package will work out at about $100
  • Works out at around $0.09 cents per day over 3 years
  • Consider the Goby subscription, more expensive but cleans better
  • Non subscription brushes also worth consideration

Reliability & long term use

This is the first Quip product I have used and all things considered they are still a relatively new company within the dental hygiene space.

The brush comes with a 1 year warranty from date of purchase if you do not subscribe to the refill plan.

Give Quip $5 every 3 months by subscribing for your replacement brush heads and that guarantee is extended for the life of your subscription, which is nice and somewhat to be expected.

Having tested the brush for a month, I have not experienced any faults or issues.  Everything seems solid, well built and of a good quality.

I have read some reports of the brushes failing or breaking, more so the plastic than the metal handled option that I have.

The lack of buttons and parts to this brush make it a little more robust and the vulnerable battery is nicely sealed inside the brush handle and it would take quite some wear and tear for water or moisture to build up inside and cause any damage.

I suspect given Quips apparent approach should you have any issues, a replacement would be issued with little in the way of questions asked.

Conclusion

There is no denying that Quip offers a certain level of convenience.

It is a perfect addition for the millennial who loves a good subscription, such as Netflix and Spotify, except this one if for your dental health.

Having brush heads and even toothpaste delivered to your door every 3 month’s makes life easier.  You do not need remember when you last changed the brush head, the delivery acts as that reminder.

There is certainly praise to be given for the minimalist, simple and practicality that is the Quip handle, and the way the holder acts as a cover too.

Simplicity and design are nice, but when the job of an electric toothbrush is to help clean the teeth, I can’t help but feel Quip falls a little short of the mark.

As a seasoned electric toothbrush user, the motor feels weak, the clean no better that a manual brush and certainly not as invigorating as deep cleaning as other electric brushes I have used.

Overall the concept and idea is a great and if subscription plans are your thing, it is worth considering.

However, something like Goby feels like it delivers a better clean. The technique required Quip does in a way do away with one of the key benefits of switching to electric. You may want to forgo the subscription and get a better value and more effective solution by sticking with the well know brands like Oral-B or Sonicare.

Electric Teeth Rating

Electric Teeth 3 Star Rating

Size Guide

  • Height (without head) – 5.11 inches/13cm
  • Height (with head) – 7.60 inches/19.3cm
  • Width – 0.6 inches/1.5cm
  • Thickness – 0.6 inches/1.5cm
  • Weight (without head) – 1.35oz/38.2g
  • Weight (with head) – 1.50oz/42.5g

All are approximates

FAQ

  • Is the Quip an oscillating brush?
    • No, it is a Sonic brush with 15,000 movements per minute
  • Does it have any other cleaning modes?
    • No, there is only 1 cleaning mode.
  • What brush head does it come with and what alternative ones can be used?
    • Quip comes with only 1 style of brush head and no others are available. Their brush head contains 1,200 soft DuPont nylon bristles inserted into 34 tufts to give each tooth a gentle cleaning. These bristles are considered soft.
  • Does Quip have a pressure sensor?
    • No, it does not.
  • Does Quip have Bluetooth?
    • No, it does not.
  • Does Quip come with a warranty & how long is it?
    • If you buy Quip outright, with no subscription plan, the warranty is 1 year.  If you subscribe to a refill plan, then the warranty continues for the life of that subscription.
  • Does Quip have a built-in timer?
    • Yes.  There are 2 parts to the timer.  There is the 2 minute timer, that activates from power on and turns the brush off after 2 minutes running time.  There is too the quadpacer.  The brush will provide an audible warning through a slight pause in the brushing mode to tell you to change quadrants.  There are 4 quadrants to the mouth, and brushing is normally for 2 minutes.  The timer will active at 30 second intervals, with 3 pauses at 2 minutes.
  • How long does the battery last?
    • About 3 month’s on average, based on 1 user cleaning twice a day for 2 minutes.
  • Does it come with a charger?
    • No, the brush uses, user replaceable AAA batteries.
  • Can this be fixed to a wall?
    • Yes, the travel cap/holder sticks to smooth surfaces like tiles or mirrors.
  • Can I use Quip the shower?
    • Yes. Quip is water resistant so if you choose you can use it in the shower. You will need to consider keeping out of direct flow of the water if using the wall mount/holder.
  • Does it come with a travel case?
    • Yes, a travel case is included.  It doubles up as a toothbrush holder.

Your Opinions

Do you own or have you used the Quip electric toothbrush?

Are there certain features that you really like or dislike?

Let me and other users know your opinions know, your input is valuable.

And of course, should you have any questions, just ask.

Summary
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Quip Toothbrush
Author Rating
31star1star1stargraygray
Jon Love

About Jon Love

Jon is a leading voice on electric toothbrushes and has been quoted by mainstream media publications for his opinions and expertise.

Having handled & tested hundreds of products there really is very little he does not know about them.

Passionate about business and helping others, Jon has been involved in various online enterprises since the early 2000s.

After spending 12 years in consumer technology, it was in 2014 that he focused his attention on dental health, having experienced first-hand the challenge of choosing a new toothbrush.

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6 thoughts on “Quip Toothbrush Review”

  1. I liked my Quip. It was sleek, easy to use, quiet, and soft. Over two years though, I got 4 cavities after never having had any in my lifetime. At my last dental appointment, my dentist strongly recommended I try a professional quality electric toothbrush – OralB or Sonicare. I chose the former and the difference in sensation is vast. The OralB leaves my teeth feeling dentist-office clean and I haven’t had any cavities since. My advice: the convenience and style of Quip aren’t worth the sacrifice in oral hygiene (or the thousands spent on fillings).

    Reply
  2. Have you tried replacing batteries on all these brands? One of our Oral Bs has a battery that won’t take a charge and I was going to go through the replacement process, which involves. I don’t like the idea of throwing it in the trash when only the battery has failed.

    I am tempted by the quip, but your review comment “Cleaning experience feels weak in comparison other brushes” is concerning.

    Reply
    • Hi Steve.

      I haven’t made any significant efforts to replace the batteries in the electric toothbrushes I have tested. It is possible, although it goes against the warranty conditions for most brands. However, by this time the brush is usually outside the warranty period. You can buy replacement batteries, you just usually have to be quite good with a soldering iron and quite good at taking things apart and rebuilding them.

      I understand your concern about my comment. That is my personal feeling. When you compare Quip to Oral-B it is a very different sensation and can feel like it is not cleaning the teeth.

      That is not to say it can’t or it doesn’t. It is an American Dental Association approved toothbrush. However, the cleaning action is different, Quip requires more manual input compared to an Oral-B brush.

      Reply
      • Thanks for the fast response. I’ll replace this battery and perhaps wait a few years to see if anything changes in the market!

        Reply
  3. I have a number of gumline fillings and the Quip is the only electric brush that doesn’t immediately knock those out. I have trouble with the shape of the head as I have an abnormally sensitive gag reflex—touching the tissue behind my back molars makes me gag, up to 10 times per 2 minutes of brushing. I would much prefer the option of a round head like Oral-Bs that alleviates that particular problem. Had to give up the Oral-B due to the aforementioned filling-destroying issues.

    Reply
  4. One toothbrush did not work upon opening. Several battery changes works intermittantly maybe twice and quits. Initially thought it was the low quality battery as the other one ordered, at the same time, quit after a few uses but after putting a quality battery in it continues to work several months later.
    Contacted customer services. Ten emails later doing everything asked now just receive no response at all. Tried calling.
    Over a month later after my initial request for action I still have not received the promised replacement. I took the pictures, answered the questions and sent it back.
    Okay, I was conned. Fine. I will have to satisfy myself with being another one of your unhappy customers that have complained to the BBB and google reviews. Good idea, innovative and convenient, poor product quality and poorer customer service.

    Reply
    • Hi Linda.

      Sorry to hear about the situation.

      Just to be clear, we are not Quip, the manufacturer, we simply reviewed their product.

      I have to say I am somewhat surprised you have been treated so poorly by Quip based on what I have seen and heard. It is a shame it has gone this way for you.

      Reply
  5. I had never heard of Electric Teeth before–found it only after I purchased a Quip. Mostly for travel although I take my Sonicare with me–it lasts for about 10 days and isn’t heavy. But the Quip should be a helpful substitute. I hope.
    Your review of the Sonicare 2 was excellent–far more complete and useful than most product reviews. I’ve used a Sonicare for years (maybe 15 years?) and you answered several questions: I’ve never known which replacement heads to buy because there’s no model number on it. I had a much older model at first and couldn’t figure out which heads to buy. Glad to know now they all will fit.
    I find the “new” re. charger base inadequate and too easy to tip over on my vanity top.
    But the Sonicare has saved by gums and teeth after my dentist said my gums were in very bad shape from poor brushing.
    Also glad to hear your informed preference for the Sonicare–current ads are claiming that round brush heads are better–not true.
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Barry.

      Thanks for the comments and the compliments on how complete our reviews are 🙂

      Depending on how you look at things there are and will always be a benefit to going for one brand over another. Small round brush heads can be easier to get to the back teeth, but I can’t say the difference is that great that they are the only ones to use.
      Most important thing is brushing your teeth correctly and regularly, be that with a manual or electric toothbrush.

      Reply
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