Amabrush Review

Medically Reviewed By: Dr. Gemma Wheeler

(GDC Number: 83940)

Amabrush Review

Editor’s Note

Update June 2019: Amabrush have filed for insolvency. You can read their statement about this here.  We do not anticipate the company continuing and no further products will be produced.

Visit our mouthpiece toothbrush page for more information on other similar products.

Our Verdict

It does not clean the teeth anywhere near as well as it should. It is a massive disappointment.

It is not fit for daily use.

Conceptually, this type of toothbrush is the future, but there is a lot to be perfected before it is ready for daily use.

Pros

  • Innovative
  • Multiple cleaning modes
  • Magnetic mouthpiece
  • Built-in toothpaste dispenser
  • Timed clean
  • Battery life

Cons

  • It doesn’t clean the teeth very well
  • Mouthpiece is large & uncomfortable
  • Poor toothpaste dispensing
  • No battery status
  • Delay from powering on to cleaning beginning

The 3 BIG questions about Amabrush

If you are short of time, the answers to the following 3 questions should let you know all you need to about Amabrush.

For more detail, you can read the full Amabrush review further down the page.

If I have missed something, let me know in the comments.

1. Is there anything drastically wrong with this toothbrush?

Yes.

It does not clean the teeth very well at all.

You should stick to a regular electric or manual toothbrush for now.

The concept of Amabrush is certainly the future. However, it is not suitable for daily use at this time and you should not buy it.

2. Which other brushes should I consider?

Amabrush is unique, there really are few other products like it.

At the time of review, there is no direct competitor or alternative available to use right now.

However, 2 other crowdfunded alternatives are due to be available soon.

Those alternatives are Ufunbrush and Y-Brush, which we have written about in our article on mouthpiece toothbrushes.

The closest commercially available product is 30 Second Smile. A little more like a traditional electric toothbrush, it is able to clean both the top and bottom row of teeth in just 30 seconds.

Resorting to more conventional brushes, the Philips Sonicare ProtectiveClean 4100, which we currently rate as the best electric toothbrush, is your best option for now.

3. Where’s the best place to buy Amabrush?

At the time of writing, Amabrush is only available from the company directly at www.amabrush.com.

It is not currently sold through other stores or outlets.

Why should you listen to us?

Electric Teeth is an independent organization with a mission to simplify dental health.

Our team is a mixture of consumers and dental professionals.

We strive to create honest, informative content, telling you the facts, good or bad.

We are not sponsored by big brands or healthcare companies. Our site is funded by affiliate revenue and ads, but we only recommend products that we have tested and truly believe to be worth your money.

Why not watch this short video to find out all about us?

Video Review

Amabrush Review – Brush your teeth in 10 seconds

And now for a bit more detail…

Amabrush has come about as a result of a hugely popular crowdfunding campaign, originally on Kickstarter, that raised a staggering €3,195,516 ($3,641,122), 6000% over the original target of just €50,000 ($57,000).

For those not familiar with crowdfunding platforms, they allow the public to back the ideas of creators and essentially give creators the power to realize their product or service.

This is not a risk free option for those who back it and most projects incur complications in the journey from successful funding through to project completion.

Amabrush is no exception here.

The concept was dreamt up by Marvin Musialek and his team. The crowdfunding campaign drew international attention as they offered a product that breaks the mold on what many of us have known and practiced for years.,

Dentists in many countries around the world recommended cleaning your teeth twice a day for just 2 minutes. Amabrush allows you to clean twice a day for just 10 seconds a time, but also brushes each tooth for longer.

In this review, I will explain what Amabrush is, how it works and what it is like to use on a daily basis.

What I wish to make clear, is that within this review, I am not going to talk about the funding campaign, the way it has been handled, the delays and the pros and cons of funding such a product, unless it is directly relevant to a point being made.

I am interested in the finished product and how it works and whether it was worth the investment.

For transparency, I backed this on Kickstarter, with my own money. I was backer number 1071. I have not been given a sample or paid to write this review.

What is Amabrush?

Being unique, Amabrush ideally needs a little explanation.

Amabrush is a mouthpiece toothbrush.

It is made up of 3 parts, the mouthpiece, handpiece, and a toothpaste capsule.

The toothpaste capsule fits to the handpiece that in turn connects to the mouthpiece.

The mouthpiece is a one size fits all component made from antibacterial silicone that has 3D bristles to clean the teeth and built-in microchannels that transport the toothpaste to your teeth.

It fits into the mouth and around the teeth much like a gum shield, covering the back, front and biting surfaces of your teeth.

The bristles are soft enough to prevent gum damage but strong enough to clean your teeth and the silicone kills 99.99% of bacteria.

All the electronics are built into the handpiece, which attaches to the mouthpiece via magnets.

A built-in battery can last for several weeks and when switched on, offers more than 10,000 vibrations per minute to move the bristles and clean your teeth. A manual pump mechanism delivers the right amount of toothpaste to your teeth.

The detachable handpiece module has a built-in battery that can be charged wirelessly thanks to a technology called Qi (chee) charging, when required.

Brushing all your teeth at once, Amabrush finishes in as little as 10 seconds. All you have to do is press a single button and wait for those 10 seconds and you will have perfectly clean teeth, in theory at least.

How does it work?

The fundamental principle of how Amabrush works is similar to a regular manual or electric toothbrush. However, where you would normally apply toothpaste and move the toothbrush around the mouth, with Amabrush, you put it into the mouth and loosely bite into it like you might a mouthguard.

Once in position, a single press on the button will launch this into action and begin brushing all your teeth, in just 10 seconds.

Once done, remove, rinse and continue your day.

A natural question to have is how can it brush in just 10 seconds?

Amabrush cleans all your teeth simultaneously. With regular toothbrushes, manual or electric, you clean one surface of the tooth at any one time.

You should brush for at least 120 seconds. This means that for the average mouth with 32 teeth, you clean each surface for just 1.25 seconds. With Amabrush, every surface is cleaned for 10 seconds, because all teeth are brushed simultaneously.

This means: every surface gets brushed 8x longer and the total toothbrushíng duratíon ís 12x less (10 seconds instead of 120).

The following video is well worth a watch to best understand the concept.

Original 10-Second Toothbrush | Amabrush® Explained (Top Product 2018 from Kickstarter)

Variants of this toothbrush

There is only 1 style of Amabrush, but there are different packages that offer different items in the box.

The following are the package options available (correct at the time of writing).

  • Amabrush Starter Set Basic – Normally $149.99 – Available for $129.99
    • 1 x Mouthpiece
    • 1 x Handpiece
    • 1 x Toothpaste capsules (x3)
    • 1 x Wireless charging station
    • 1 x MicroUSB power cable
  • Amabrush Starter Set Pro – Normally $179.99 – Available for $159.99
    • 1 x Mouthpiece
    • 1 x Handpiece
    • 1 x Toothpaste capsules (x3)
    • 1 x Wireless charging station
    • 1 x MicroUSB power cable
    • 1 x UV sanitizing station
  • Amabrush Starter Set Ultimate – Normally $199.99 – Available for $179.99
    • 1 x Mouthpiece
    • 1 x Handpiece
    • 1 x Toothpaste capsules (x3)
    • 1 x Wireless charging station
    • 1 x MicroUSB power cable
    • 1 x UV sanitizing station
    • 1 x Wireless charging travel case

Please note that early campaigns on Kickstarter and Indiegogo offered different packages and price points.

A word on fakes and counterfeits

There is only 1 official Amabrush product.

However, due to the innovative nature of this product and the media hype that came with the initial funding campaign, a large number of replicas and fakes have been listed on the internet from less trustworthy sources.

Some use the Amabrush name and the Amabrush images, whilst others use the name and different images.

Many people have parted with money and never received a product, essentially being scammed.

There are also very similar products, but they are legitimately sold under a different name and look different and have different features.

This, therefore, is a word of warning.

At the time of writing, the only place to purchase the official version of Amabrush is from Amabrush themselves at www.amabrush.com.

What’s in the box?

What you get in the box will be subject to which variant you purchase, but in the Amabrush Starter Set Basic we are testing you get the following.

  • 1 x Mouthpiece
  • 4 x Mouthpiece colored rings
  • 1 x Handpiece
  • 1 x Toothpaste capsules (x3)
  • 1 x Wireless charging station
  • 1 x MicroUSB power cable
  • 1 x Safety instructions
  • 1 x Quick start guide/welcome letter

Key Features

  • Can clean the teeth in just 10 seconds – saving you time, but actually cleaning each tooth for longer than regular brushing
  • 3 cleaning modes – standard, massage and power
  • Silicone mouthpiece that kills bacteria
  • Built-in toothpaste dispenser
  • Rechargeable battery built-in
  • Recharges wirelessly
  • Automatic power off
  • Bluetooth connectivity

Pro & Cons

Here are what I believe to be the advantages and disadvantages of Amabrush.

The Positives

  • Innovative – It is a clever concept that cleans all the teeth at the same time. All the teeth can be cleaned in just 10 seconds, with each tooth being cleaned for longer than they would with regular toothbrushing.
  • Cleaning modes – Multiple cleaning modes with different intensities and running time for different users.
  • Magnetic mouthpiece – Easy to attach and remove the mouthpiece, thanks to the magnets that hold it in place.
  • Toothpaste capsules – A built-in dispenser saves time and mess with applying toothpaste directly into the mouthpiece.
  • Timed clean – Automatically powers off at the end of the 10 or 20 second cleaning cycles.
  • Battery life – Very impressive. Lasts over 4 months on the 10 second cleaning cycle.
  • Wireless charging – Charges wirelessly by sitting it on a charging stand.
  • MicroUSB connectivity – Universal power connector makes it easier to recharge the handpiece.
  • Cost – Not too expensive when you consider what it offers.

The Negatives

  • Clean – It is terrible, it does not clean the teeth anywhere near the standard you might expect and fundamentally does not do the job it is designed for. Very weak vibration in the mouthpiece, but very strong in the handpiece.
  • Mouthpiece – Large and uncomfortable. The 1 size fits all design does not work in my opinion.
  • Toothpaste dispenser – Does not distribute toothpaste well and each capsule will not last as long as advertised.
  • Battery status – No indication of how much power remains in the brush.
  • Cleaning modes – Not very clear which cleaning mode you have selected. You have to remember the color of the LED and how many times you have to press it.
  • Timed delay – A 1-3 second delay in the handpiece actually starting from pressing the power button. Seems unnecessary.
  • Accessories – Several accessories coming soon, but at the time or review are not available.
  • Cost – Expensive when you consider it does not actually do the intended job very well.

Design, usability, clean & general use

Amabrush is really quite different to anything you may have seen or used before.

When I first came across Amabrush, I thought this is ridiculous. The whole concept seems too good to be true. However, the more I thought about it, the more I realized this is a feasible and practical solution.

My thoughts and confidence in such a product have been reconfirmed having used 30 Second Smile, an electric toothbrush that brushes both the top and bottom row of teeth at the same time.

This is much more like a regular electric toothbrush, but it shaved 90 seconds off the brushing time and I don’t feel like I have missed out or that my oral health is worse as a result.

Knocking 110 seconds off each tooth brushing session seems like madness, and you can just imagine what most dentists would say.

It really is madder still when you think that not only are you reducing your brushing time by some 90% each session, but you actually end up with each tooth being brushed on average 8 times longer than they would be with a regular manual or electric toothbrush.

It doesn’t sound quite right until you really think about the way in which it is working, cleaning all surfaces of the teeth at the same time.

According to a tool Amabrush created, as a 30 year old who brushes for 2 minutes twice a day I could save some 51 days of my life, just by switching to Amabrush. 51 more days to do what I like…yes, please!

So, all looking good right, this is the biggest innovation in the oral healthcare space for years…?

Conceptually, yes.

In reality, no.

Let me explain in more detail why this is.

The initial unboxing experience is very positive.

A little larger than I expected, a white box is wrapped with a cardboard sleeve.

This sleeve has all the main information printed on it, the sort of standard stuff you would expect of an outer box for a product. A large photo, key specifications and features of the brush.

Being designed by a team of Austrians, the language on the packaging is mainly German. Not at all unsurprising, but I had suspected it may have been in English given the global appeal this product has received. No big issue though, it is what’s inside I am interested in.

With the sleeve removed the white box has a simple Amabrush logo on the front. A very clean, almost clinical look to the packaging.

You open the box right to left, like a book. It reveals 2 halves of the box. 2 white covers further protect what is inside. On each cover in the bottom corner is printed what you will expect to find beneath them.

On the left side is the accessories and on the right the handpiece and mouthpiece.

To reveal the items, there is a turquoise ribbon that you pull open.

It is a very smart, premium feeling unboxing experience.

The wireless charging station and toothpaste pods are individually boxed, on the left side, but sit within a plastic tray.

On the right side of the box is the handpiece and mouthpiece that sit in another plastic tray, covered by a piece of protective plastic film and polystyrene.

Also included is a safety instructions booklet, a quick start guide complete with a brief introduction letter from the team as well as a number of colored rings that fit to the mouthpiece.

So all unboxed you get:

  • 1 x Mouthpiece
  • 4 x Mouthpiece colored rings
  • 1 x Handpiece
  • 1 x Toothpaste capsules (x3)
  • 1 x Wireless charging station
  • 1 x MicroUSB power cable
  • 1 x Safety instructions
  • 1 x Quick start guide/welcome letter

So, no lies here, this initial unboxing was very pleasing and had me very excited for what was to follow.

The handpiece measures in at approximately 2.5 inches (7cm) tall and about 2.3 inches (6cm) wide.

I think it is best described as a slightly squashed egg/oval shape.

The bottom of the handpiece is flat, so it can stand perfectly upright on a tabletop.

The top of the handpiece is mostly flat too, giving a surface onto which the mouthpiece can attach.

The rest of the unit is rounded with a soft curvature to it.

No harsh square edges on the side and no rubber grips as such to grip onto, because it is not necessary.

The handpiece is made from plastic and is a slightly off-white color.

On the front are 2 rubber/silicone buttons that sit within a turquoise shield shaped panel.

Both buttons are rounded, with the upper toothpaste dispensing button being slightly larger.

The lower button is the power button.

Both have embossed icons on them to show what they do.

Not immediately obvious until you turn the unit on, is there is also an LED that sits below the power button. More on this shortly.

On the rear of the handpiece is a large recess into which the toothpaste pod fits. When fitted, this molds perfectly into the handle to give an almost seamless design and finish.

The pods are made of plastic but are transparent so you can see the paste inside. As the pod is fitted to the handle a small protuberance inside the handle fits into the pod to draw the paste into the pumping system.

These are supposed to slide in and out, as shown in the following video, but I found them a little stiff to remove.

How to change the Amabrush® Toothpaste Pod

Towards the very bottom of the handpiece on the back is the A of the Amabrush logo.

The base of the handpiece is flat, with no rubber grips or feet.

The top of the handpiece is again flat with the exception of a very small centrally placed, but small nozzle that is the feed for the toothpaste into the detachable mouthpiece.

Strong magnets allow for the mouthpiece to be held in place.

Align the mouthpiece with the handpiece and they snap together.

Whilst the mouthpiece can be moved when connected to the handpiece, it does not move too easily, giving enough resistance that it is not going to slide all over the place, but is not impossible to detach.

I am not sure of the exact construction, but the mouthpiece itself looks to have an inner plastic and metal frame to give strength and allows for the toothpaste pumping system or ‘micro-channels’ to exist.

The built-in micro-channels transport the toothpaste from the pod to your teeth, when the manual pump is activated.

That micro-channel system results in 8 small holes on either side of the mouthpiece through which the toothpaste is dispensed.

This is all wrapped in a white colored antibacterial silicone that kills 99.99% of all bacteria.

It can be cleansed by normal rinsing under the tap, as you would do it with regular toothbrushes, but you can go one stage further and use the optional UV santizier for extra peace of mind.

The mouthpiece is shaped somewhere between a U and a V to align to the 2 rows of teeth found in the mouth.

A term you might not be familiar with, but is well known in dental/medical circles is the Bass-Method. It is an approach for cleaning the teeth and along the gumline effectively.

The bristles of the mouthpiece are angled perfectly at 45 degrees to clean the teeth and gum.

On either side of the mouthpiece are 8 rows of bristles. 4 for the front of the teeth and 4 for the back of the teeth. Each row has different sized bristles. This is probably best visualized by taking a look at our hands-on images, but essentially you have 8 rows of bristles focused on each row of teeth.

The bristles are in Amabrush’s words, comparable to soft-bristled toothbrushes, to ensure the most comfortable, safest toothbrushing. They are indeed quite soft.

The mouthpiece has been designed to work for almost all individuals, whether you have your natural teeth, dentures, implants, wisdom teeth or braces.

With the mouthpiece attached to the handpiece you can go about using Amabrush.

Here is where things get interesting.

The mouthpiece is designed to be a 1 size fits all solution.

Now, I only have 1 mouthpiece available for this review, so I can’t get the opinion of others, but I don’t think this approach works.

I would not consider myself as having a small mouth, but I don’t think I have the largest mouth either.

Sadly fitting the mouthpiece into the mouth is quite difficult.

Despite having silicone bristles, the inner structure is fairly rigid and there is little flex in the mouthpiece, far less than I had imagined.

When putting it into the mouth it really stretches the cheeks and the depth means that the mouthpiece touched the very back of my mouth and applied pressure in a way it was almost uncomfortable.

If you have ever had the dentist take impressions of your teeth using the molding putty, the feeling and experience is quite similar in my opinion. It might even invoke a gagging sensation for you.

At times, the mouthpiece would move or lift slightly from the handpiece as I tried to place it in the mouth. The magnets always realigned it, but basically, the mouthpiece is liable to move if it is a tight fit.

After a few goes, I got more used to it. I still apply a bit of pressure to the mouthpiece sides to flex it a bit, to fit it into the mouth. It is still far from the most pleasant experience and I believe many with smaller mouths simply won’t be able to comfortably fit it within their mouth.

In the development phase of Amabrush, over 2,000 different people’s mouths to come to the conclusion that there is generally a relatively small variance in the size and overall shape of people’s mouths that they didn’t need to create different mouthpieces.

I can’t argue with the data, but this is surprising to me, given how I have felt using the mouthpiece.

It should be noted that Amabrush is not suitable for those aged 14 years or below.

Not that you ever look you most appealing when brushing your teeth, you do look quite strange with this big thing hanging out of your mouth.

You can use it hands free when in the mouth, the handpiece remains firmly attached to the mouthpiece thanks to the strong magnets.

To use the brush you will need to fit a toothpaste pod into the handpiece.

Supplied with the starter kit I am testing you get 1 pod of each of the 3 types of paste Amabrush make. I will explain more about each paste shortly.

This paste is pumped into the mouthpiece by pressing the top button on the handpiece.

Amabrush claims it will deliver the perfect amount each time. I found you needed to press it at least twice, if not three times to get some paste through and even then it appears to be a small amount.

You don’t need much, but the way it is delivered and the shape of the mouthpiece means it feels like the paste only ever reached the biting surfaces of my teeth. At no point, even during use, did I feel like the paste actually made its way up the front and back of my teeth, and into the interdental spaces.

I suspect many users would pump more and more to get more paste out, but not really be met with much better results and wasting paste in the process.

Ignoring the lack of paste coverage, it is now time to turn the handpiece on.

There are 3 modes, standard, power and massage.

Press the power button once to turn the brush on and launch the standard cleaning mode that lasts for 10 seconds.

This is the mode that drew everyone’s attention to Amabrush.

When activated this will show a blue light from the LED, but you won’t really see this, unless you stare down your nose, because it is almost entirely out of view when the mouthpiece is in the mouth.

This is the standard mode for everyday brushing.

Press the power button twice and you activate the power mode which lasts for 20 seconds and will show a violet light from the LED. You get the most bristle movements from this mode.

It is not documented how many times the bristles are supposed to move on each mode, but there is a noticeable power bump when selecting the power mode.

Press the power button three times and you activate the massage mode. This lasts for 20 seconds and will show a magenta light from the LED. This is more gentle on the teeth and gums.

The handpiece has a built-in timer. It automatically turns the handpiece off once each cleaning cycle has ended.

The handpiece does not remember which mode you used previously. This means that if your preference is the power mode, every time you use Amabrush you will need to press that power button twice.

I don’t understand why the ‘standard mode’ does not make use of the full power of the motor, I suspect this has something to do with battery life. I would have thought the shortest cleaning mode would have been the most powerful to try and deliver the best results?!

I am not entirely sure why this is the case either, but after pressing the power button, there is a 1 or 2 second delay before the motor kicks in. Not a massive issue, but it is not instant and when time saving is a selling feature of this brush, the delay seems to go against this.

When any of the cleaning modes, if you hold the handpiece in your hand, you can feel the difference between each of the modes. You can also feel this when the mouthpiece is in the mouth too.

Now this is where we get to the real problem with this mouthpiece/electric toothbrush.

The vibration of the motor does travel from the handpiece through to the bristles on the mouthpiece. You can feel it, and if you look closely at the bristles you can see them moving.

However, when in the mouth, for me I felt no cleaning sensation. I could feel the vibration through my teeth and jaw as the cleaning cycle ran, but after use on any of the modes available my teeth felt no cleaner than before I used it.

I did not get the tickling or brushing sensation I would have expected on the teeth or gums.

The movement of the bristles and the contact with the teeth is simply not good enough.

It does not actually clean the teeth, the very thing this is designed to do.

Add to this the way in which the paste is delivered and you don’t even get that toothpaste fresh sensation, just a very light taste of paste on the biting surfaces of some teeth.

Given that a toothbrush is designed to clean the mouth, this is extremely disappointing.

The actual unboxing experience, quality of materials and design etc are all very good, but the one most important job it has to do and it doesn’t do it.

My teeth feel clean every time after using a Sonicare or Oral-B electric toothbrush.

Even if I used Amabrush for 10 minutes I wouldn’t have had teeth that felt cleaner.

It is the physical motion of the bristles and brush heads on these trusted brands that appear to make the difference.

Amabrush have actually put together a tutorial video as to how you should use it properly.

How to use the Amabrush® properly

I watched it repeatedly to make sure I was doing everything right.

I tried many times over several days to use it again, just in case, I was doing something wrong.

But no, I was doing everything right. After countless attempts, I concluded it simply does not clean the teeth.

This is not what you want from a toothbrush.

Normally, I would test a new toothbrush for several weeks, but Amabrush was put to one side after just a few days, I had to switch back to my trusty Oral-B, for the sake of my dental health. I am sure you understand.

I want to show you first hand how poor the cleaning action is.

The best way to do this I believe is by making use of a plaque disclosing tablet. You can see the results below.

As is clear there is a lot of plaque and debris (pink and purple color) left on the teeth and very minimal difference between the before and after images.

This is not the case when using a regular electric toothbrush.

There is no denying the motor in the handpiece is working, you can hear and feel the vibration, but the lack of physical connection, between the mouthpiece and the handpiece is the problem in my opinion.

I am not an engineer, but if there was a physical connection of some sort, I suspect that the cleaning experience may well be better.

The use of silicone bristles may also have a part to play.

Nylon bristles have been the go to option for many decades. Brushes like the Foreo ISSA 2 challenge this with silicone, but I have not been as impressed as I am with nylon.

The thinner bristles of nylon I believe help with the effectiveness when it comes to cleaning and this is why Y-Brush uses nylon instead of silicone.

I try to remain unbiased in any review I write, but this is a real shame. I wanted Amabrush to work, but there is absolutely no way I can suggest that you should use this product in its current state.

The initial concept put forward by Amabrush was that when the mouthpiece was placed in the mouth and bit into lighty, the silicone flexes to meet the contours and shape of that users teeth and gumline. This simply is not the case.

The bristles were meant to be soft enough to prevent gum damage but strong enough to clean your teeth precisely. The bristles were to move rapidly sweeping away plaque and debris on the teeth, along the gumline and as best as possible in between them too.

The bristles are soft and I think they are strong enough, but they don’t move enough to create any noticeable cleaning action.

Amabrush never set out or claimed to make this better than a regular manual or even other electric toothbrushes. Their view is that a toothbrush is a tool. And tools are only as good as the person using it. The key thing is that many people use the toothbrush the wrong way, or even worse, are not using them at all.

Brushing teeth is a job where you really should apply concentration to deliver the right technique. Electric toothbrushes, for example, are designed to simply be moved from tooth to tooth. The brush does the movement of the bristles and the cleaning for you, but many people will brush erratically and with no pattern with both manual and electric.

Amabrush was designed to make toothbrushing less annoying. Some people hate toothbrushing so much, that they don’t concentrate when brushing, don’t brush for long enough or not at all.

For those with a disability, it may not even be possible to brush at all.

Amabrush have the goal of delivering the right toothbrushing technique for everyone and automatically.

As I have discovered that goal has yet to really be realized.

It’s not all doom and gloom, there are some good elements, however, but these are coupled with a few more negatives too.

Battery life is very good and recharging the battery is fairly simple.

You can potentially go months between charges and when it needs charging you sit it in the wireless charging stand to replenish the battery. Power connects to the stand, rather than the handpiece itself. More on both of these in the ‘battery life’ section of the review.

A number of accessories were announced as part of the initial crowdfunding campaign. A few alterations have been made, but these have yet to materialize.

To be fair, Amabrush have been quite open that the accessories would arrive after the main handpiece and mouthpiece. Given that Amarbush was delayed by a year, it is no surprise that these will follow in the coming months.

Therefore as of December 2018 when I write this I am unable to make any significant comment on these based on my own hands-on time.

If I were in Amabrush shoes I think I would have shipped the handpiece before accessories, but things like the travel case can to some degree alter the opinion of the final product.

Just what accessories are on offer?

  • Antimicrobial mouthpiece
  • Toothpaste pods
  • Wireless charging station
  • Mouthpiece holder
  • Wireless charging travel case
  • UV sanitizing station

Antimicrobial mouthpiece (AM-AM01) – $9.99

Identical to the one supplied in the box, this can be purchased as a spare, replacement to or as an additional mouthpiece for another user.

There is only 1 size and shape.

Unlike more traditional nylon bristled brushes, silicone bristled brushes tend not to need replacement so often. On average the recommendation is every 6-12 months. However, Amabrush still recommends being every 3 months.

Fitting is simple. Detach the current mouthpiece by pulling it apart from the handpiece. Held in place by magnets, the new mouthpiece can be held just in front of the handpiece and the magnets will pull the two together and secure them in place.

Toothpaste pods (AM-TP01) – $9.99

A pack of 3 pods, you can choose from 3 flavors.

These are Extra Fresh (Blue), Pearly White (White) and Silky Mild (Pink).

When you buy Amabrush you get 1 of each, but there is no option to purchase a mixed pack as an accessory.

A single capsule lasts for more than a month according to Amabrush. However, as explained earlier in the review the dispensing is questionable and I believe in reality, at best you will get 3 weeks, but in most cases, 2 weeks use from each pod.

The toothpaste is specially formulated as it needs to be more liquid than regular toothpaste.

Traditional toothpaste should not be applied directly into the mouthpiece either.

Based on this, these replacement pods work out quite expensive, when you consider a normal tube of toothpaste will cost around $3-5 and last for about 3 months.

The Extra Fresh and Pearly White toothpaste contain 1085 ppm fluoride. The Silky Mild paste is fluoride free and all are vegan.

As I understand it, the ingredients of each toothpaste are as follows.

  • Extra-Fresh
    • Aqua, Sorbitol, Hydrated Silica, Propylene Glycol, Tetrapotassium Pyrophosphate, Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate, Xanthan Gum, Aroma, Alumina, Sodium Fluoride, Sodium Saccharin, Chamomilla Recutita Flower Extract, Salvia Officinalis Leaf Extract, Mentha Arvensis Leaf Oil, Sodium Methylparaben, Commiphora Myrrha Resin Extract, Limonene, CI 42090, CI 47005, CI 77891
  • Pearly White
    • Aqua, Hydrated Silica, Sorbitol, Pentasodium Triphosphate, Propylene Glycol, Urea, PEG-32, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Aroma, Xanthan Gum, PVP, Titanium Dioxide, Sodium Fluoride, Sodium Saccharin, Sodium Methylparaben, Limonene
  • Silky Mild
    • Aqua, Sorbitol, Hydrated Silica, Strontium Acetate, Glycerin, Potassium Citrate, Propylene Glycol, Aroma, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Xanthan Gum, Zinc Chloride, Sodium Saccharin, Limonene, CI 77891

The Relative Dentin Abrasivity (RDA) scores for each are as follows:

  • Extra Fresh – 70-80
  • Pearly White – 90-100
  • Silky Mild – 40-50

The pastes are said to come in recyclable plastic pods, but it is not clear what type of plastic they are made from and if your local recycling will accept them.

Mouthpiece holder – $9.99

Providing a home for the Amabrush handpiece and up to 2 mouthpieces, this molded piece of plastic fits around the wireless charging station that is provided with the Amabrush.

To the left side of the holder is a circular cutout, where the wireless charger sits and then to the right is a place for 2 mouthpieces to rest.

The mouthpieces rest with the magnetic base facing upwards.

Mouthpiece Holder

Wireless charging travel case – $39.99

Not supplied as standard, this travel case can be purchased to offer a convenient option for transporting Amabrush on the move.

It holds 1 handpiece, up to 2 mouthpieces and 2 toothpaste pods.
It boasts integrated charging facilities. This means that you can charge the handpiece whilst it is in the case.

To do this, you must connect the power cable (supplied with Amabrush) to the travel case and to mains power.

Finished with a premium fabric texture, a magnetic closing mechanism keeps the case securely closed.

The travel case is dirt- and water resistant.

Amabrush Travel Case Delonghi opened

UV sanitizing station – $49.99

For those really worried about bacteria then this sanitizing station is an optional accessory that can give you the peace of mind you desire.

Measuring approximately 4.3 x 4.3 x 4.3 inches (11 x 11 x 11cm), 2 mouthpieces can be placed inside this unit at any one time.

Using the microUSB power adapter that came with Amabrush the station requires power to function.

With a second USB attachment, the power can be passed through to the wireless charging station.

The UV light is activated once the lid is closed and switches off automatically after the sanitization cycle.

Amabrush UV-Station Front

Whether you classify it as an accessory or not, an extra feature that Amabrush was to have was a smartphone app so that you could manage your handpiece as well as receive and apply updates to.

The handpiece has Bluetooth (2.4GHz BLE) built-in and this wireless connection allows the handpiece and the smartphone app to communicate.

The idea is the same as that seen with the Oral-B Genius Pro 8000 and the Sonicare DiamondClean Smart.

The app is at the time of review not as comprehensive as the Oral-B and Sonicare equivalents, but what is on offer is pretty good.

Before using the app, you need to create an account. This is nice and straightforward, with on-screen guidance.

Once complete, you can now connect Amabrush to the app.

Enable Bluetooth on your smartphone and press the power button for 3 seconds, until the LED flashes a dark blue. Then press the connect button on-screen.

The app should automatically connect to the handpiece, update and you can now manage Amabrush.

You are presented with 4 main options in the center of the screen as well as 5 that run along the bottom (in a turquoise bar).

These options and what they do are as follows.

  • Modes
    • Offers granular control of the cleaning modes available on Amabrush
    • Edit the existing modes or add your own.
    • Ability to change the LED color
    • Ability to change the name of the mode
    • Ability to change the power as a percentage (%) – Lowest is 30% with highest being 100%
    • Ability to change the cleaning duration to intervals of 10 seconds, between 10 and 60 seconds
    • Ability to change the order of the modes to your liking
    • Ability to reset modes to the default settings
  • Firmware update
    • Update the handpiece as and when new software is available
  • Battery status
    • Shows as a percentage (%) how much power remains in the battery
  • Disconnect
    • Stops the connection between the app and Amabrush handpiece

And the 5 icons in the turquoise bar.

  • Home
    • The main screen with the 4 icons above.
  • Blog
    • A feed of the latest blog posts from the Amabrush website
  • Hello/Account
    • Your account page. Log out from here, reset your password and join the Amabrush newsletter.
  • Shop
    • Their online store for buying accessories.
  • i/About
    • Information about the app and the Amabrush company

It is worth knowing that Amabrush cannot be used as a toothbrush when connected to the app. The Bluetooth connection is ended if you then power Amabrush on.

Sonicare and Oral-B offer more functionality in their apps, notably a history feature which is essentially a record of when, how well and how often you are brushing.

For this reason, their apps are ‘better’ but no doubt in time such enhancements will come to the Amabrush app. For now, the features are great, I particularly like the granular control of cleaning modes.

A small but neat in box addition is the inclusion of 4 colored plastic rings. A grey, blue, pink and white colored ring is provided.

These actually snap onto the base of the mouthpiece and are intended to be used to allow you to differentiate your mouthpiece to that of somebody else in your home.

Just like Oral-B’s colored rings, it means the handpiece can be shared but each user knows, by remembering a color which mouthpiece is theirs. This is one way to get more value from Amabrush.

One of the useful features I promote on some brushes is the pressure sensor.
Amabrush does not have one, but it doesn’t need one.

The way in which the brush is designed, it is not possible for too much pressure to be applied so there is no risk of damage from incorrect brushing force being applied to the teeth or gums.

Many electric toothbrushes are water resistant, Amabrush is no exception.
The battery and motor are sealed inside the handpiece and should be protected from moisture.

IP45 rated, the handpiece will withstand water splashes, but should not be immersed in water. I would not advise using it when in the shower, if you normally like to do this.

The same LED on the front of the unit that shows what cleaning mode is active also has a few other LED patterns programmed to alert you to the status.

  • Blue (pulsing glow) – Waiting for Bluetooth connection.
  • Blue (constant glow) – Bluetooth connection established.
  • White (pulsing glow) – Amabrush is charging.
  • White (constant glow) – The Amabrush is fully charged.
  • Red – Error
  • Turquoise (constant glow) – Standard brushing mode.
  • Magenta (constant glow) – Massage brushing mode.
  • Violet (constant glow) – Power brushing mode.

The brush comes with a 1 year warranty as standard, which is not fantastic, it would be nice if it was 2 years.

When it comes to daily use then, on the whole, the experience is not great.

The product looks and feels the part, it just does not deliver on the most important aspect, cleaning the teeth.

Amabrush claims to have worked closely with dentists and dental universities during the design to address two concerns: clean teeth and no gum damage.

I wish not to discredit those involved, but my experience says they have failed when it comes to clean teeth. This is such a shame and I do wonder why they shipped it in this state?!

Have I got a faulty unit? Is my mouth not compatible?! Based on feedback from other backers of Amabrush, I don’t think I am alone with the conclusions I draw.

Summary of design, usability, clean & general use

  • Great unboxing experience with a reasonable box contents
  • Handpiece is smart, a nice size and well designed
  • Looks and feels good
  • Fantastic concept, reality not so great
  • Mouthpiece is 1 size fits all
  • Little flex in the mouthpiece, tricky to fit in the mouth and potentially quite uncomfortable
  • Does not clean the teeth well at all
  • Strong vibration but poor cleaning action
  • Not suitable as a toothbrush in its current state
  • Toothpaste dispenser is a manual pump, requiring several presses each time
  • Poor toothpaste coverage
  • Amabrush own toothpaste required – does not last as long as suggested
  • Magnets are strong to hold mouthpiece to handpiece
  • LEDs to make clear which mode is selected
  • No LED to show battery power
  • Automatic power off functionality
  • Included rings for additional mouthpiece
  • Various accessories available
  • IP rated handpiece
  • 1 year warranty

Battery life

Built into the handpiece is a battery.

This a 3.7V 160mAh rechargeable battery. It is fixed inside the handpiece and is not user replaceable.

When the power button is pressed, it is this battery that delivers the energy to power the motor and other electronics inside the handpiece and give the necessary movement to the bristles of the mouthpiece.

Given the physical size of Amabrush, you might not be surprised to learn that the claimed battery life is 4 weeks when used 2 times each day.

This sounds pretty reasonable on the face of it. But, when you remember the brushing time is only 10 or 20 seconds compared to most other electric toothbrushes that have 2 minute cleaning cycles, then you might be thinking you wish the battery lasted longer.

Oral-B brushes last now about 2 weeks, whilst Sonicare last at least 3.

It is not entirely clear from Amabrush whether the 4 weeks claimed usage time is for the standard, power or massage mode.

However, I have done my own battery tests.

Now, normally I use the brush for several weeks to really understand the battery life with real world usage, but for obvious reasons, I did not continue to use this for several weeks.

Therefore these battery life results are based on me turning the brush on, letting it run through the cleaning cycle whilst sat on a tabletop and repeating this until the battery was depleted.

Using the standard, 10 second cleaning mode (this is the mode we are most interested in right?), from a full charge Amabrush lasted an impressive 300 cleaning sessions.

That is equivalent to 150 days or approximately 4.8 months between charges if you brush twice a day.

Essentially this is 50 minutes of brushing time.

Now my testing does suggest that the battery life is nearly 5 times better than Amabrush claim.

However, their manual suggests the standby time of Amabrush is 6 weeks. My battery tests were completed in 1 day. Therefore, real world usage may be less, because the battery may lose power whilst in standby mode.

The power mode lasts twice as long, so in the simplest scenario, you can expect half the battery life.

Whilst it is good to know that the battery likely lasts longer than Amabrush claim, in reality right now this information is almost worthless, because unless you like the idea of dirty, unclean teeth you are not going to be using this mouthpiece toothbrush.

All said and done I wish to give credit to Amabrush here for clearly underplaying the running time from the built-in battery.

When the battery requires replenishment, you have 2 options. The way in which you charge it will in part depend on what package/accessories you purchased.

All Amabrush units come with the wireless charging station (AM-CS01).

The handpiece sits on this and receives a charge thanks to a wireless charging technology called Qi (chee). This is the same wireless charging technology that smartphones use, if you are familiar with this.

In fact, this is the same charging standard for the majority of electric toothbrushes, but the implementation is a little different, in that Amabrush uses a flat charging plate, whilst most others have a protuberance on the charging stand that fits into a recess on the base of the toothbrush handle.

The charging station does need to be connected to mains power to provide the charge, but there is no need to physically connect a power cable to the handpiece itself.

On the stand is a microUSB charging connector. This is recessed inside the plastic frame somewhat, so it is not the easiest to get to, but Amabrush does provide a power adapter with a specially designed connector that fits perfectly into this recess.

A 100-240V microUSB power adapter is provided.

Although fitting the Amabrush provided power adapter is the best idea, I did test the charging station with a number of different microUSB power adapters I had and it worked fine every time.

For example, many smartphones have microUSB chargers, if this is the case for you, it may well be possible to recharge Amabrush using your smartphone charger rather than the Amabrush power adapter.

I will mention that in the original design brief for crowdfunding, a USB Type-C was power connector was to be used. This is a newer and more future proofed option, but this got changed during the later stages of the development process, to the microUSB connector.

On the whole, it is not a big issue. MicroUSB is still very common and is 10 times better than a completely proprietary power connector.

I actually left Amabrush to charge overnight during my testing.

The user manual suggests it can charge in just 2 hours, which is much quicker than most other electric toothbrushes I test that need about 8-12 hours to fully charge.

When charging the LED on the front of the handpiece signals to you the battery status.

  • White (pulsing glow) – Amabrush is charging.
  • White (constant glow) – The Amabrush is fully charged.

Rather disappointingly, there is no LED indication to show when the battery is getting low.

Almost all other electric toothbrushes will have an amber or red LED to indicate it will need recharging very soon. Nothing like this exists, as far as I am aware on the Amabrush handpiece, which seems to be a little bit of an oversight in my opinion.

A small but noteworthy features it that the charging stand does have 4 little feet that stop it from slipping on countertops.

One of the optional accessories you have is the wireless charging travel case.

To be clear, the case does not charge wirelessly itself. The case requires power to be provided to it via the mains adapter, but it can charge the handpiece wirelessly within it.

Essentially its the wireless charging station in a slightly different form.

This is a neat touch and is handy for regular travelers. It is a feature offered on premium models from other companies such as the Sonicare DiamondClean and Oral-B Genius 8000.

As handy as it is, with the battery life I have experienced, charging the battery is not going to be an all too common occurrence.

Summary of battery life

  • Built in rechargeable 160mAh battery
  • Claimed usage time of 4 weeks based on 2 uses per day
  • Hands on testing managed a staggering 4.8 months (150 days) based on 2 uses per day
  • Wireless (Qi) charging station
  • Power adapter with microUSB connector provided
  • Other microUSB power cables can be used
  • Charges in as little as 2 hours
  • LED with white pulsing glow – Amabrush is charging
  • LED with white constant glow – Amabrush is fully charged
  • No LEDs to show when battery is low
  • Optional travel case that allows Amabrush handpiece to be charged wirelessly when travelling

Price & where to buy

An electric toothbrush can cost as little as $10, but the average electric toothbrush that I see most consumers and readers of this site opting for, typically costs anything from about $40-100.

Of course there are those that are more expensive, the DiamondClean Smart from Sonicare in particular stands out.

Ultimately a product is only worth what you are prepared to pay for it.

Some of the most expensive brushes add in lots of features and contents in the box, some more necessary than others.

You know as well as I do, that often you pay a premium for innovation. This is in part why the DiamondClean Smart from Sonicare is so expensive because it offers some novel, not seen before features that to some are really quite compelling.

So what does a toothbrush that reduces your brushing time by some 90% but also cleans each tooth 8 times longer cost?!

The answer is not as much as you might think.

At the time of review the retail prices are as follows:

  • Amabrush Starter Set Basic – $149.99
  • Amabrush Starter Set Pro – $179.99
  • Amabrush Starter Set Ultimate – $199.99

Ignoring the fact that Amabrush at present doesn’t actually clean the teeth properly, quite honestly, given the prices of other products I have tried and tested, these prices are remarkable.

I think Amabrush could add another $40-50 to the price and it still be acceptable.

However, in reality, I would not suggest spending a single dollar on Amabrush at the moment.

Like a regular toothbrush, be that manual or electric, this mouthpiece toothbrush does require the mouthpiece to be replaced every 3 months on average (although you might get a little longer from it).

This naturally comes at a cost. That cost is $9.99 per mouthpiece.

For the sake of comparison, Oral-B heads cost around $6-8 on average and Sonicare heads $10.

Something else to factor in is that you cannot use regular toothpaste, you have to use the Amabrush toothpaste pods.

Whilst I don’t believe you can get a months use from a single pod as Amabrush claim, for the sake of this calculation I will presume this is achievable.

A pack of 3 pods (3 months paste) costs is $9.99. 3 pods are supplied in the box.

Here at Electric Teeth, we like to work out approximately the cost of ownership over a 3 year period to give some way of comparing different brushes in what they offer for the money.

Based on the cost of the Amabrush starter kit, the 11 additional mouthpieces and toothpaste pods required, over a 3 year period, it will cost a total of $370 or $0.34 per day.

Given the uniqueness of Amabrush comparison is a little unfair, but the reality is this is the alternative choice, given Amabrush doesn’t clean the teeth like all other brushes do.

30 Second Smile which is perhaps the closest and saves considerable time compared to regular brushing will cost $262 over 3 years and $0.24 a day.

Oral-B’s flagship Genius Pro 8000 costs $165 or $0.22 a day.

Sonicare’s DiamondClean Smart cost $0.29 a day.

A more average or entry level electric toothbrush will come in at about 7-10 cents per day.

But Amabrush is no conventional electric toothbrush. It is innovative, time saving and offers more advanced features that are more comparable to the higher end models.

If you think that this is expensive, another way to look at it is as follows.

With a regular brushing routine of 2 x 2 minute sessions a day, you spend 1460 minutes brushing, which is equivalent to 24.3 hours.

With Amabrush, that time is reduced to just 2 hours, that is a saving of 22 hours.

If you could put the time saved to working and your hourly rate was $15. In 1 year alone you could earn an extra $350! Based on buying Amabrush, it will have paid for itself in just 1 year!.

I appreciate that the calculation is not this simple or straightforward, but this is certainly one way you could look it.

Extra value can be achieved, if you share the handpiece with another user. A husband, wife, partner or housemate. Just have your own mouthpieces.

This said, there is no point buying Amabrush right now, so however, you look at it some of the more conventional electric toothbrushes are better value options as well as better for your dental health.

Please note that all prices quoted are approximates and will vary based on location, supplier and time of purchase.  These figures were correct at the time of writing and should not be relied upon as hard fact, but used as a guide during your decision process.

Summary of price & where to buy

  • Recommended retail price of $149.99 for starter kit
  • Replacement mouthpieces cost $9.99 and require replacement every 3 months
  • Requires Amabrush own toothpaste to be factored into the cost.
  • Replacement toothpaste pods cost $9.99 for 3 months supply
  • Works out at around 34 cents per day over 3 years
  • Conventional electric toothbrushes are cheaper, but don’t save the time Amabrush does
  • Conventional brushes are where you should spend your money at this time
  • Extra value can be achieved by sharing the handpiece

Reliability & long term use

Amabrush are a new company and their product is completely new in the category of dental health.

As such there is nothing to go by in terms of really saying how reliable the product is or what it is like to use long term.

The early impressions around material quality are good. It feels solid and looks the part in hand.

I have of course made it abundantly clear that this is not a product you should or would want to use on a daily basis as yet.

The toothpaste pump could do with some design improvements to deliver an appropriate amount on 1 press and of course Amabrush need to work on actually making this a useable product.

One could argue that long term use will lead to inferior dental health if you stuck with this.

Cutting some slack, credit must be given for the design and build. The magnets are strong and although little flex in the mouthpiece I can see the quality.

I have used other brushes that feel much cheaper and less reliable.

Somewhat surprisingly the warranty is just 1 year, it would be nice if it was 2 years in length.

Not that this should have a bearing, but from my communication with Amabrush they seem to be a reasonable, understanding and attentive bunch who I am sure are going to be doing what they can to do right by the customer.

Conclusion

Amabrush is an entirely new concept and one that has and will continue to be met with skepticism from the public and dental professionals, I understand and expected this.

A toothbrush that can clean the teeth in 10 seconds, yet actually brush each tooth for longer than regular tooth brushing session seems a little like a dream right now.

The current product lives up to this skepticism.

It does not clean the teeth anywhere near as well as it should. It is a massive disappointment.

It is not fit for daily use.

Before Amabrush became a real product I said, ‘In an industry as mature as dental, it is not often that something revolutionary comes along, but now might just be one of those tìmes’. I can safely say having now used it, now is not quite one of those times.

Amabrush has not transformed my brushing routine, nor does it win shelf space in my bathroom.

There are some positives though, in my opinion.

Other factors, such as packaging, material quality, and overall design have been achieved to a very high standard.

But what good is a toothbrush that doesn’t actually clean the teeth?

I didn’t expect it to clean better than anything else available today, but I thought it would be equivalent to a regular brush at least.

My testing has been far from close to the standards of clinical trials, but you don’t need clinical trials to tell you that it doesn’t work.

Can this be fixed through software updates? I highly doubt it.

Can this be fixed by a new/revised version of Amabrush? Quite possibly.

Conceptually as an idea and on paper Amabrush is the target to strive for.

In reality, the current physical product is a long way from hitting that target.

Even the most thorough toothbrushers would I am sure, opt for Amabrush if it worked.

I cannot, nor do not recommend Amabrush at this time.

Resort to a regular electric toothbrush or a manual one if you prefer.

You might think it deserves a 0 star rating, seeing as it doesn’t actually clean the teeth, but I have awarded it 2 stars.

These 2 stars are really to acknowledge there as some positives here, the concept, the battery life, the design etc.

I am sure the likes of Oral-B or Sonicare were never worried about such competition, but I like the innovation and challenge to the convention that Amabrush are trying to push here.

On a personal level, I genuinely want this to deliver on its promises. I would even back another campaign if there was evidence a working solution was in sight.

Yes, there has been disappointment, but I am excited for the future and new iterations of this brush, maybe Amabrush 2.0 will the product I hoped version 1.0 would be.

Maybe the likes of Y-Brush will be a better product?!

Electric Teeth Rating

Electric Teeth 2 Star Rating

Size Guide

  • Height (without mouthpiece) – 2.7 inches (7cm)
  • Height (with mouthpiece) – 5.1 inches (13cm)
  • Width – 2.4 inches (6cm)
  • Thickness – 2 inches (5cm)
  • Weight (handpiece) -2.6oz (75g)
  • Weight (handpiece & head) – 4.09oz (116g)
  • Weight (handpiece, head & toothpaste pod) – 5.07oz (144 g)

All are approximates

FAQ

  • Does it have any other cleaning modes?
    • Amabrush has 3 cleaning modes. Standard, power and massage. They last for 10, 20 and 20 seconds respectively. Standard is for everyday cleaning, power offers a more intense cleaning action whilst massage is more gentle.
  • What brush head does it come with and what alternative ones can be used?
    • Amabrush comes with 1 mouthpiece (what you might refer to as a brush head), unless you purchase a variant that includes multiples. This mouthpiece is designed to be used by adults and children over the age of 14. It is a one size fits all mouthpiece. There are no other styles or sizes available.
  • Does Amabrush have a pressure sensor?
    • No, it does not. Due to the way in which Amabrush is used, a pressure sensor is not necessary, it is difficult to apply too much pressure.. You bite into the silicone mouthpiece and the soft bristles brush the teeth and gums.
  • Does Amabrush have Bluetooth?
    • Yes , it does.
  • Does Amabrush come with a warranty & how long is it?
    • Yes. 12 months (1 year) is the length of the warranty.
  • Does Amabrush have a built in timer?
    • Yes. The timer is programmed for 10 seconds for the standard cleaning mode and 20 seconds for the power and massage modes. It automatically turns the unit off once the cleaning cycle is complete. It does not have a typical 2 minute timer and 30 second pacer that many are used to as it does not apply.
  • How long does the battery last?
    • The battery in the handpiece will last for up to 4 weeks, based on 2 cleans per day, from a single charge, according to Amabrush. My own testing revealed it can run for much longer, potentially months rather than weeks.
  • Does it come with a charger?
    • Yes, Amabrush comes with either a wireless charging station that is powered using a microUSB power adapter.
  • Can this be fixed to a wall?
    • No. Amabrush or its charging solution have not been designed to fit to or be mounted on a wall.
  • Can I use the Amabrush in the shower?
    • Whilst the handpiece is IP rated, I would not advise it.
  • Does it come with a travel case?
    • Only if you buy the ‘Ultimate’ kit. It can be purchased as an accessory if required.
  • Does every family member need a separate Amabrush?
    • No. Just like a regular electric toothbrush, you need only a different mouthpiece/brush head for each user. The handpiece that delivery the power and makes Amabrush work can be shared between different users. Magnets hold the mouthpiece and handpiece together.
  • How can I clean the mouthpiece?
    • The mouthpiece can be cleaned by rinsing with water only. Made from antibacterial silicone the mouthpiece resists 99.99% of all bacteria, meaning it is perfectly safe to use with nothing more than a rinse.
  • Does it work with braces?
    • Yes, it does. However, the clean is not and will not be as effective as the brackets and fittings will misplaces and bend the bristles if you have braces on the frontside of your teeth. Rear mounted braces like Invisalign are fine to be cleaned with Amabrush. It is however always worth checking with your dentist before doing so as there may be exceptions.
  • Are there different sized mouthpieces?
    • No. There is only one size of mouthpiece. Made from flexible silicone it adapter to each users mouth. It is not suitable for those under the age of 14.
  • How much toothpaste does it use and how long does a capsule last?
    • Amabrush uses roughly 1.23 fluid ounces (0.35ml) of toothpaste per session, and a single toothpaste capsule lasts for a whole month according to Amabrush. However in reality it lasts no more than about 3 weeks.
  • Is there a fluoride-free toothpaste option?
    • Yes, the Silky-Mild toothpaste is fluoride free.
  • Interdental cleaning – Do I still need to floss or use interdental brushes?
    • Yes. Normal flossing and interdental cleaning is required. Amabrush is not designed to replace this.
  • How often should the mouthpiece be replaced?
    • It is recommended to replace (just the mouthpiece, not the whole device) every 3 months, like manual and electric toothbrushes.
  • Are there any indicators on the mouthpiece to distinguish between them?
    • Colored rings can be fitted to the mouthpiece to act as an indicator as to which mouthpiece belongs to which individual.
  • Are there different mouthpieces with soft, medium or hard bristles?
    • At present there is only a soft bristled mouthpiece option available. This is comparable to soft-bristled toothbrushes. This ensures the most comfortable and safest brushing. Other versions are not expected or available at this time.
  • What are the angles of the bristles?
    • The bristles are positioned at 45 degrees to effectively clean the teeth and gums in order to stimulate the bass method recommended by dental professionals.
  • What are the ingredients of the toothpaste?
    • Extra-Fresh
      • Aqua, Sorbitol, Hydrated Silica, Propylene Glycol, Tetrapotassium Pyrophosphate, Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate, Xanthan Gum, Aroma, Alumina, Sodium Fluoride, Sodium Saccharin, Chamomilla Recutita Flower Extract, Salvia Officinalis Leaf Extract, Mentha Arvensis Leaf Oil, Sodium Methylparaben, Commiphora Myrrha Resin Extract, Limonene, CI 42090, CI 47005, CI 77891
    • Pearly White
      • Aqua, Hydrated Silica, Sorbitol, Pentasodium Triphosphate, Propylene Glycol, Urea, PEG-32, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Aroma, Xanthan Gum, PVP, Titanium Dioxide, Sodium Fluoride, Sodium Saccharin, Sodium Methylparaben, Limonene
    • Silky-Mild
      • Aqua, Sorbitol, Hydrated Silica, Strontium Acetate, Glycerin, Potassium Citrate, Propylene Glycol, Aroma, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Xanthan Gum, Zinc Chloride, Sodium Saccharin, Limonene, CI 77891
  • Can I use my own toothpaste?
    • No, you need to use that offered by Amabrush.

Your Opinions

Do you own or have you used the Amabrush mouthpiece toothbrush?

Are there certain features that you really like or dislike?

Let me and other users know your opinions know, your input is valuable.

And of course, should you have any questions, just ask.

Summary
Review Date
Reviewed Item
Amabrush
Author Rating
21star1stargraygraygray
Jon Love

About Jon Love

Jon is a leading voice on electric toothbrushes and has been quoted by mainstream media publications for his opinions and expertise.

Having handled & tested hundreds of products there really is very little he does not know about them.

Passionate about business and helping others, Jon has been involved in various online enterprises since the early 2000s.

After spending 12 years in consumer technology, it was in 2014 that he focused his attention on dental health, having experienced first-hand the challenge of choosing a new toothbrush.

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7 thoughts on “Amabrush Review”

  1. Hi Jon,

    Like you, we supported Amabrush during the initial exploration and even interviewed the founder for our website. We funded Kickstarter so that we would receive an Amabrush sample which to this day has still not been delivered, so we have not been able to post a followup review like you have. Thank you for your thoroughness in reviewing the product, and we are so disappointed that it does not live up to the hype and promise.

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  2. Do NOT purchase! Terrible experience with Amabrush! Paid in full and still never received the product after waiting 6 months. I had to constantly email on why the delay. They had one excuse after the other. Website indicates you can cancel anytime but no place on their site on how to do that and no matter how many times I emailed asking how to cancel & get refund I got no response. Had to get credit card to dispute charges to get money back.

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  3. I ordered amabrush in Sept 2017 and have yet to receive a product. I have asked for a refund and they flat out said “NO”. So, after almost a year and a half with no product, I don’t have any faith in this company or product.

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    • Yeah I”m in the same boat with these people. Total rip off. I never got anything and they won’t give me a refund either. Waiting for someone to start a class action lawsuit. I’ve been a backer for 2 years and never got anything. Total scam.

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  4. Thanks for this thorough review! I have been eagerly awaiting reviews of this and similar brushes, and am thrilled to find one here.

    I am a backer for uFunbrush, and I hope you will review that one as well, though my hopes that it will fare better are dim. But I can admit that I did not back it expecting it to brush better than I currently do with my Sonicare. I backed it expecting it to do better than my then 4-year old, now 5-year old triplets do with THEIR Sonicares. I brush their teeth at night, but in the morning they do it themselves, as there is no time for any help. As you might imagine, their efforts leave a lot to be desired. I had hoped that this would at least improve upon their puny results, but this review has that hope seriously in doubt….

    Sigh.

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    • Hi Tracey.

      Thanks for taking the time to read this review.

      Did you get everything you need from it?

      I did not actually back Ufunbrush, so am not entirely up to speed on the progress with that Kickstarter campaign. Perhaps you can tell me what the situation is with that one?

      It is reassuring you have backed it with the knowledge that it will not be better than Sonicare, but better than what your children currently achieve, when they are brushing in the morning at least.

      I am no scientist, but I think perhaps children’s mouths are perhaps more uniformly sized than adults, but no doubt there is still variance.

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