Instafloss – Initial thoughts and reaction

Instafloss is a slightly different take on the very popular water flosser product, which I have been covering for some time here at Electric Teeth.

It is due to begin shipping in December 2020 — we have one on order and will update this page until a full hands-on review is available. You can order here from Indiegogo

In the sections below I give my initial thoughts and reactions based on previous testing of similar products, and explain in detail what Willo is and how it works.  

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Instafloss - Initial thoughts and reaction 1

Around 47% of Canadians are not flossing daily. 

A somewhat alarming statistic, it’s not all that surprising, given how awkward, painful and time consuming it can be.

With plenty of practice, flossing does become easier and your mouth will be healthier.  Yet, many of us still don’t do it or do it regularly enough and when we do, we use the wrong technique.

Instafloss is a possible solution that addresses both convenience and speed and appears to be less technique sensitive.

The theory is you will be able to floss all your teeth in just 10 seconds, and do so thoroughly.  

This is thanks to 7 water jets that push pressurized water to the gum line and around the teeth. The power of the water cleans away plaque and debris that can lead to dental health problems such as gum disease.

I am certainly in favour of any product that makes managing oral health easier and entices more to maintain a good routine.  

Waterpik have been making water flossers for years and I can clearly see how Instafloss’s approach improves on an already tried and tested product.  Cleaning both arches of the teeth at the same time, rather than tooth by tooth.

Some of the stats in the marketing of this product whilst correct, actually come from studies on Waterpik products and could be misunderstood as being specific to Instafloss.  The approach used here is slightly different, so the clinical results could be too. Potentially significantly better!

It is not a ‘cheap’ tool.  Basic dental floss is more cost effective. You are also tethered to a power socket with this. But, it is a product I can see being very appealing for many because of the benefits it brings.

Timeline of updates

At the moment Instafloss will begin shipping to backers in December 2020.

We will update this section of the page as time goes on with any further news on availability.

  • December 2020 – Delivery of first units due
  • August 4th 2020 – Reaches $1 million/CDN £1.3 million in funding
  • July 9th 2020 – Campaign moves to Indiegogo
  • July 9th 2020 – Campaign ends with 6,595 backers $812,272/ CDN $1.06 million raised
  • June 9th 2020 – Reaches funding goal within 6 minutes!
  • June 9th 2020 – Project launches with a goal of $20,000/CDN $26,500

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Instafloss Explained

Countertop water flossers have been around for many years.  They are dominated primarily by one brand, Waterpik.

Instafloss is a slight rethink on the way that a traditional countertop water flosser works.

Instafloss water flosser unit

Rather than the nozzle sending just one jet of pressurised water, with Instafloss, there are 14 jets continually pushing water out.

This is 7 jets per arch of teeth.  The mouthpiece has 2 sides, so you are cleaning both the top and bottom teeth in your mouth at the same time.

Instafloss Cleaning Action

3 jets focus on the back of the teeth, whilst 4 jets are aimed at the front of the teeth.  

Held at a perfect 90 degree angle to the gumline, the water dislodges and cleans away bacteria and plaque that sits on and under the gumline as well as in between the teeth.

Instafloss - Initial thoughts and reaction 2

It is said to give a 360 degree clean of the teeth and does so with more ease and convenience than regular string floss.

In fact, it reaches areas of the gumline that string floss simply can’t.

Instafloss vs String Floss

The pressure of the water can be controlled by a rotating dial on the unit.  It is not clear how many pressure settings there will be.  Waterpik typically offer 10 settings ranging from 10-100PSI.

It is not clear to me whether the water flow is switched on and off via the handle or the main unit, but it looks like it will be controlled via the main unit itself.

The base unit is where all the electronics are located, sealed inside.  A water tank or reservoir sits on the top (capacity unknown) and a pump inside pushes this out through the 2 foot hose and through the mouthpiece attached to the handle.

It has a 5” diameter and is 10” tall.  This is a similar size to most other water flossers.  It comes in white, but coloured sleeves in grey, mint, and black can be purchased to personalise your unit.

Instafloss Water Flosser Unit Black

The power supply is dual voltage, and it should come supplied with the appropriate plug/adapter for your country.

Mouthpieces are interchangeable, so multiple users can share 1 Instafloss unit.  

The recommendation is that each user replaces their mouthpiece every 3 months.  This seems quite frequent, given the relatively short space of time you will be using it for each day.

There is only 1 size of mouthpiece, which is said to be suitable for 98% of people. Made from silicone so it should be soft on the teeth and gums should it come into contact with them.

If you have seen a mouthpiece toothbrush, this is essentially a mouthpiece flosser of sorts!

The design is such that you are said to be able to floss your teeth in just 10 seconds, 12x times quicker than regular methods.

The company claims it is 2x more effective than manual flossing as well as being more comfortable and I would be inclined to agree based on what I have seen and know.

Water flossing has been proven in clinical studies to be effective.

Instafloss quotes some of the results in their marketing materials.  Whilst they don’t specifically state they apply to their product, it could be interpreted as such. 

They state:

Compared to string, water flossing is:

  • 151% as effective at reducing gingivitis (Barnes CM, et al)
  • 129% as effective at removing plaque (Goyal CR, et al)
  • 200% as effective at reducing bleeding (Rosema NAM et al)

The study by Goyal (available here) claims a 29%, not a 129% improvement.  This was actually carried out using a Waterpik water flosser.

The reduction of bleeding shown in the study by Rosema (available here) was also conducted using a Waterpik product.

I am a little concerned about how the claims have been displayed because at least 2 of these are based on a product, similar, but different to Instafloss.  It is fair to some extent to assume similar results, but it is not fact.

I suspect their approach could actually deliver better results, but without proper testing, we won’t know. 

Instafloss Logo

I think what Instafloss will do considerably better is getting around the molars at the back of the mouth which traditionally are the hardest to clean around.

There are a team of engineers and dental professionals creating this device and they are all headed up by Eli Packouz.

$179 will be the retail price for this unit, but if you head over to Indigegogo you can get a discount for pre-ordering and backing the project early.

Instafloss looks to be an exciting new take on water flossing.  It is not really revolutionary, but it is an enhancement on an approach we already have.  Sometimes, the simplest adaptations are the best and I am inclined to suggest this could be one such example.

And to close out, here is Instafloss’s own promotional video.

Introducing Instafloss: The Automatic, 10 Second Floss

About Jon Love

Jon is a leading voice on electric toothbrushes and has been quoted by mainstream media publications for his opinions and expertise.

Having handled & tested hundreds of products there really is very little he does not know about them.

Passionate about business and helping others, Jon has been involved in various online enterprises since the early 2000s.

After spending 12 years in consumer technology, it was in 2014 that he focused his attention on dental health, having experienced first-hand the challenge of choosing a new toothbrush.

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